The volcanic wines of Italy

WHAT SETS APART SOME OF THE MOST EXHILARATING ITALIAN WINES TODAY? NEW BENCHMARKS FOR COMPLEXITY AND LONGEVITY HAVE ONE THING IN COMMON: VOLCANIC SOILS.
By Kerin O’Keefe
Published on the 2018 Febraury Issue

Farther north, Giovanni Dubini, co-owner of Palazzone, has mostly sedimentary clay soil of marine origin, though the highest point of one of his vineyards is interspersed with tuffaceous soil.
“Some of the grapes from this part of the vineyard go into our Orvieto Classico Superiore Campo del Guardiano,” says Dubini. “Grapes from this plot deliver a purer expression and make wines with more longevity.”
Orvieto, Orvieto Classico (the original growing area) and Orvieto Superiore (more structured) must be made from a minimum of 60% Procanico and Grechetto. There are several types, which range from dry (secco) to sweet (dolce) as well as a Muffa Nobile (noble rot, or botrytized) version.

Continue Reading